A Ball for Daisy by Chris Raschka

A Ball for Daisy by Chris Raschka

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Publishing: Schwartz & Wade, New York, 2011

Awards: Caldecott Medal Winner

Description: This wordless book shows Daisy and her favorite ball. In a scuffle with another dog, the ball pops and Daisy is sad until her flat red ball is replaced by a new blue ball.

Programming: The following site has some great ideas, including having students discuss the loss of a beloved toy and how they felt, writing narrations and captions for the illustrations in this book, and acting out parts of the book.

http://abcsofreading.blogspot.com/2012/07/a-ball-for-daisy.html

 

Owen by Kevin Henkes

Owen by Kevin Henkes

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Publishing: Greenwillow Books, New York, 1993

Description: Owen has a yellow blanket that he loves. When nosy neighbor Mrs. Tweezers tries to give Owen’s parents several ways to get rid of the blanket, Owen thwarts them all. Owen’s mother comes up with an idea that will make everyone happy.

Illustrations are done in different sized panels and fairly bright colors. The text is sufficient to tell a detailed story without being overwhelming on any pages.

Programming: Have students talk about their favorite object and why it is important to them. I also like the idea of character mapping Owen, found here: http://pinterest.com/pin/55521007876286411/

I am very intrigued by Kevin Henkes books and may choose to do him for a group author project, so there may be more Kevin Henkes to come!

Emma’s Rug by Allen Say

Emma’s Rug by Allen Say

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Publishing: Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 1996

Description: Instead of a blanket or a teddy bear, Emma’s most prized possession that she has had from birth is a rug. When she begins walking, she carries it with her and stares at it for hours, drawing inspiration for many prize-winning drawings. After her mother washes the special rug, however, Emma must learn to re-discover the inspiration inside herself. The illustrations in this book are beautifully realistic. The book has an elegant feel due to the use of white space, consistent borders around both text and illustration pages, and the fact that illustrations always appear on the recto and text on the accompanying verso.

Programming: I would start with asking what children like to draw and whether or not they see a picture in their heads or copy it from something else. In other words, “How do you know what to draw?” This would be a great chance for some kind of art activity: drawing, finger painting, etc.