Cinderella by Marcia Brown

Cinderella by Marcia Brown

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Publishing: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, New York, 1954

Awards: Caldecott Medal Winner

Description: This book is the traditional Cinderella tale. There is quite a bit of text by today’s standards, and illustrations are line drawings with pastel colors. 

Programming: This list from the ALA has a lot of great resources for Cinderella stories from many different cultures. Students could read several of these and compare and contrast. There are also several film adaptations of the tale, and crafts might include making their own crowns or shoes. 

Many Moons by James Thurber

Many Moons by James Thurber

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Illustrated by Louis Slobodkin

Publishing: Hartcourt, New York, 1943

Awards: Caldecott Medal Winner

Description: Princess Lenore is very ill, and the only thing that will make her better is if she can have the moon. So her father, the king, calls upon his Lord High Chamberlain, wizard, and mathematician to try to get the moon for his daughter. Each says it is impossible and gives a different description of the size and distance to the moon. Finally, it is the jester who solves the problem by going back to the source: the princess herself. The cover of this book is much more colorful and intriguing than the rest of the illustrations, and the text seems a bit lengthy and pointless in places. (The lists each official gives the king, with items on the end that that man’s wife has added, for example.) These seem to be attempts at humor, but I am not sure if kids today would be intrigued enough by the pictures to listen.

Programming: This could be read with Kitten’s First Full Moon and similar discussions could take place: what does the moon look like? What is it made out of? With all of the characters and humorous dialogue, it might be good to do this story with puppets, or maybe have older students act it out.