I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen

I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen

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Publishing: Candlewick Press, Somerville, MA; 2011

Awards: Geisel Honor Book

Description: The predecessor to This is Not My Hat, this book tells the story of a bear who is looking for his hat. He finds it and takes revenge. Text and illustrations are both very simple, with a lot of reading between the lines.

Programming: I admit, I was having a hard time drawing my own ideas for this book, but this website has some great ideas:

http://www.teachingideas.co.uk/library/books/iwantmyhatback.htm

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My Friend Rabbit by Eric Rohmann

My Friend Rabbit by Eric Rohmann

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Publishing: Roaring Book Press; Brookfield, CT; 2002

Awards: Caldecott Medal Winner

Description: Mouse is friends with Rabbit, even though “whatever he does, wherever he goes, trouble follows.” When Rabbit gets their plane stuck in a tree, he has a plan to get it down. Though the plan doesn’t work out very well, Mouse knows that Rabbit means well. Each illustration resembles the cover, with a mostly blue background and drawings with thick, black outlines. The colors are bright and aesthetically pleasing.

Programming: I think this is a story that could benefit from a felt story board, because the background doesn’t really change and all you would need are felt cutouts of each character. I think discussions about this book could center on friendship and what makes a good friend.

Creepy Carrots by Aaron Reynolds, illustrated by Peter Brown

Creepy Carrots by Aaron Reynolds, illustrated by Peter Brown

Creepy Carrots by Aaron Reynolds, illustrated by Peter Brown

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Awards: Caldecott Honor Book

Publishing: Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers, New York, 2012

Description: This book tells the story of Jasper Rabbit, who begins to see the carrots he routinely takes from Crackenhopper Field following him home, stalking him in every part of his life. Readers are unsure if the carrots are, in fact, sinister, or if Jasper’s guilt is simply manifesting itself in illusions. The style of the illustrations is cartoon meets Alfred Hitchcock film, with black and white drawings punched up with pops of orange. Illustrations are bordered in thick black, and shadows create an eerie effect.

Programming: I think this would be a great Halloween book because of the scare-factor in the story. It is the perfect mixture of scary and silly. It might also be a good story about guilt and how it can make you feel bad. While I would appreciate the irony of using this story at Easter, it probably would not be the best choice.